Ceramics: Christ and Thomas

Luca della Robbia, Christ and Thomas 
Ceramics
By MARY MARGARET SIMS

Luca della Robbia was an Italian sculptor from Florence. He was born in 1399 and died in 1482. He is remembered mostly for his tin-glaze technique that he passed down for many generations. He not only sculpted out of stone but also used a clay called terracotta. Terracotta means “baked earth” and it is a type of earthenware that is used to make durable and sustainable pieces. 

His most famous terracotta sculpture is Christ and Thomas. He was commissioned by a political party named Guelphs. It depicts Thomas doubting the resurrection of Christ. The sculpture carries a lot of feelings of sorrow and doubt. The Guelphs were not pleased with this piece because the glaze was from a different sculpture in the city.
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Ceramics: Horus Falcon Vessel

Unknown, Horus Falcon Vessel
Ceramics
By MARY MARGARET SIMS

Horus is a god of the sky, war, and hunting. It the first god to be worshiped by all of Egypt. Egyptians made pottery before they started building the pyramids. We know that because the drawings on the stones of the pyramids had large vessels and pots. There were two types of clay that was from the Nile river red/brown clay, and marl clay. 

This Horus FalconVessel was made for a functional purpose rather than decorative. It was most commonly used as a vase. It was made and a range of different sizes from three inches to three feet. The end of the vase comes to a point so it can be stuck into the ground for storage. It mostly stored water, oil, wine, and grain. Later on the Horus Falcon Vessels were painted with beautiful golds, blues, and reds.
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Ceramics: Unika Classic Vase in Blue Glaze

Tortus Copenhagen, Unika Classic Vase in Blue Glaze 

Ceramics
By MARY MARGARET SIMS

Eric Landon, also known as Tortus Copenhagen, is a professional potter and designer. He is the Co-Founder of Tortus Copenhagen located in Copenhagen, Denmark. Erics love for pottery started when he was just 16. He graduated from the Danish school of Design in Copenhagen, and has received numerous awards for his ceramics. Tortus works with a grog-free stoneware and every piece that he sells is handmade in his studio in Denmark. 

Eric likes to focus more on fluid vases with a simple glazing technique. His glazing is mosting made up of the primary colors. This vase is called Unika Classic Vase in Blue Glaze. The body and form is very minimalistic. The blue glazes helps to bring out the overall beauty in this piece by not overpowering the feminine form.
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Ceramics: Oval Basin


Bernard PalissyOval Basin, 1550

Ceramics
By MARY MARGARET SIMS

Bernard Palissy was a French ceramicist and scientist in the 1500s. He was known for his rusticware, and was inspired by nature. He mostly made large oval platters with animals and vegetation on it. Palissy would design casts of dead animals and attach them onto his basins, ewers, and platters. He casted these precise clay animals because he was interested in close observation. He would then paint them natural colors with a shinny lead-based glaze on top to make it look more realistic. In the Oval Basin, Palissy used snakes, frogs, fish, lizards, crawfish, and shells to make his clay casts. He used a warm yellow orange glaze to make the animals pop and bring the whole piece together.
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Ceramics: Summer Sun/ Inlaid Nesting Bowls

Andrew Molleur, Summer Sun/ Inlaid Nesting Bowls

Ceramics
By MARY MARGARET SIMS

Andrew Molleur is a ceramicist and designer that was born in rural Connecticut but now lives and works in Kingston, New York. He was immediately drawn towards ceramics. Andrew uses multiple techniques that range from traditional to modern. Most of his works are functional pieces with geometric shapes. He went to Rhode Island School of Design and studied architecture, industrial design, and ceramics.
Andrew designs and creates all of his molds to produce all of his forms and uses a technique called slip casting. In this nesting bowl set the geometric designs are not painted on but rather individual hand laid pieces of colored porcelain. And the textures on these bowls are from the constant use of each mold. Andrew likes to use very minimalistic colors in all his pieces. Mostly using a grey scale with a pop of color.
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Color Theories: Mark Rothko

Mark Rothko, Black on Grey, 1970

Color Theories
By  NAYOUNG KWON

Black on Grey portrays the life of the world renowned abstract expressionist Mark Rothko. He became well known for the ability to swiftly create modern pieces that expresses the way he sees the world. From multiple unbearable depressions and unstable pressure that Rothko's art career becomes a long ride of a roller coaster. In his earlier time of his career in art was moving steady and different transitions can be seen through the colors that he use.

The painting consists two colors of black and grey, but the grey is layered with fine layers of different tones. It can also be noticed that there are no concept of space which creates a feeling of isolation and loneliness. The color black itself can be seen through the personality of Rothko. The color feels secretive, serious yet it holds power and control, but releases sadness and these colors portray how Rothko felt over the years of his life and his career. It can be sensed from the painting that Rothko could have needed to break away from the pure pressure and frustration that he had built up. Self-denial and not being able to enjoy the little things even though he wishes to. However, it takes strong mind to create pieces that show one's true void of emotion because it's difficult to find out how one truly feels about themselves. Being able to express his sorrowful lives by choosing and laying out desired colors without being scared of those who critic is truly incredible.
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Color Theories: Gustav Klimt

Gustav Klimt, The Park, 1909-10 
Color Theories
BY NAYOUNG KWON 

Gustav Klimt, an Austrian Symbolist painter became successful for his gentile female portraits and using materials such as gold leaf. His delicate touches within the paintings give calming effects to those who see it. From his childhood Klimt was gifted with artistic talents that enabled him to grow as a fine artist despite living in poverty. With his dedication to use his skills efficiently, Klimt observed other artist's techniques and tricks to create his very own style. His observation and practice has provided him with success after success in the world of art. 

Green, the color of nature - symbolizing growth, harmony, freshness, and fertility -  becomes a part of Klimt's art career. Green shows few characteristics in Klimt, such as stability and endurance of competitors, and the ability to move forward with out hesitation or flinching. His development of his own style quickly grows like the trees in this painting, The Park. This painting consists of different cool tones of analogous colors (Yellow, Green, Blue) where green and blue provides the focal points and yellow used as a touch of highlights to show warmth. The painting is symmetrically pleasing and the collaboration of colors come together and create satisfaction when looking at it.
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Color Theories: Franz Marc

Franz Marc, The Yellow Cow,  1911 
Color Theories
By NAYOUNG KWON

Born in Germany, Franz Marc became an iconic figure during WWI, for his courageous actions in the battlefield. Not only he successfully gained honor in the war, he was famous for his bright, and colorful paintings. Over the years of his art career he developed his own code to portray his emotions and thoughts through color. The color blue is used to portray masculinity while the color Yellow was to show feminine, joy, and softness, and finally red portrayed the blocking the sound of violence. These three primary colors are simple yet at the same creates an odd but sad feeling when looking at his works.

When looking at most of Franz Marc's paintings he uses mostly blue, to show the masculinity within himself, and the expectations from the society that he has to bare. The animals that he paints could mean that he's comparing the humans with wild animals that are experiencing the same emotions and violence. That us humans are nothing more than animals and we don't have the choice but to live with it. In The Yellow Cow, yellow it portrays femininity but it also shows unsuitability. The cow in the painting moves freely but it looks as if its running from something. The bright color combination of red, blue, and green sets off as a background while creating a focal point of yellow. The urge to escape from noises of violence, and masculinity that he has dealt with portrays in the cow running through the fields -- just like Franz Marc.
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Color Theories: Matisse

 Henri Matisse, The Red Studio, 1911
Color Theories
BY NAYOUNG KWON

Henri Matisse, successfully covered three movements: Fauvism, Modernism and Post-Impressionism, and helped define the world of visual arts during 20th century. During his childhood, Matisse became interested in painting to the disappointment of his father, while his mother supported his career in art. His dedication towards art grew strongly, as he describes it being "A kind of paradise" and could be an escape from chaos events in his life.

The color red is passionate, powerful,vibrant and eye-catching. Matisse loves using vibrant colors like red because it shows dominance. His strive for success and desire to move forward in the world full of competition can be seen through the color. Matisse is courageous in terms of using red because he was able compliment red with other colors but also created it as a focal point instead of making it into distraction. In The Red Studio, the color red accomplished the resist of illusion of a visually cramped studio. Although the symmetric walls give satisfaction, Matisse throws off the boring and consistent flow by adding crooked chairs and table. His use of red is energetic but also calming, the style that he has developed over the years with the use of red, have attracted millions of individuals to fall in love with this painting.


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Color Theories: Van Gogh


Color Theories
By NAYOUNG KWON 

Vincent Van Gogh, a Dutch painter who focuses on post-impressionism became world renowned for creating pieces that reflects the every day life of what he sees. However his use of bold textures, themes, and the mood seems to give the feeling of mystery, especially in his choices of color. In mid point of his artistic career, Van Gogh's characteristics can be viewed through not the textures or themes but his colors. The colors show different emotions, and psychological behaviors that he suffered over the short years of his life.

The most common color that can be seen through out his art collections are blue. Psychologically speaking, people who use the color blue more often go through personal rejection, lack of communication and social skills, and they are easily discouraged. And the reason why the color fits well with Van Gogh is because he went through all those common traits. Even from his childhood, he could not have functioning relationships with friends or family. All the trauma and anxiety that he has experienced, he shuns them by painting.

Van Gogh successfully radiates the feeling of mellowness and melancholy in Starry Night with the use of yellow. The of warmth of the color reveals Van Gogh's distant relationship with the people around him, and how the sources of the light in the painting are far away. On a deeper level, the painting reveals Van Gogh's inner loneliness and the frustration towards himself and society.
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